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Peugeot 405 Estate brake mystery

Messages 1 to 5 of 5.

Jon reynolds
Joined Dec 2006
4 posts

Hi,
Am reaching the end of my tether with this car!
Have replaced the brake compensator valve (the car is a 96 2.0 petrol estate, with discs all round)
I have bled the brakes til I am blue in the face, including pre bleeding the rear calipers, and cannot get another bubble of air out anywhere.
The brake pedal is now firm, until you start the engine, whereapon it sinks to the floor, and no amount of pumping seems to improve it.
I have changed the master cylinder, and the servo appears to be holding a vacum, so am assuming that it is ok.
I am running out of ideas, can anyone help before I set fire to it!
Jonathan

Thursday, 28 December 2006

Discussion Archived

L.B.
Joined Dec 2005
3310 posts

One thing you can try which costs nothing is to clamp off all 4 flexi pipes and see if the pedal stays hard when you start it up, this check will eliminate or verify any problems with the brakes at all4 hubs.
Just use grips or pipe clamps preferably to do this.
If you find that you do get a pedal back then remove 1 clamp at a time and try it (with the engine running) and see when the pedal goes soft again.
If the pedal stays soft even with all 4 flexi-pipes clamped off and you've already tried another master cylinder then it may possibly be a problem with the compensator.
A lot of cars have a bleed nipple on the master cylinder as well which is easily forgotton about but I dont think the 405 has this if memory serves.
P.S. Is your car actually a 405 on a 96 ??? and not a 406 ?


THERE'S NO REPLACEMENT FOR DISPLACEMENT !

Friday, 29 December 2006

Discussion Archived

madmark
Joined Apr 2005
379 posts

hi there
i presume that the brake pedal was ok before you changed the compensator ?
Because the bleed nipple is not at the highest point on the caliper there is a big chance that there is still air trapped in the caliper,remove the caliper with pipe work still connected and position it so that the bleed nipple is at the highest point and try bleeding the brakes this way (make sure that the piston is all the way in and clamp it in this position ).when bleeding the brakes, pump brake pedal at least 25 times to ensure the brake lines are free of air.
do this to each rear caliper.
this way will ensure that all the air is removed from the calipers
i have had to do this a many times over the years

madmark
peugeot tech

Friday, 29 December 2006

Discussion Archived

Jon reynolds
Joined Dec 2006
4 posts

Mystery solved,
Turns out that the car has had new calipers on the rear, prior to me buying it.
As the car failed its mot on rear brakes, I naturally thought it was the compensator valve, as the thing was not connected, the spring had rusted through and was just hanging there.
I removed the rear calipers again, and bled them with a vacum pump, which cured it, I know not why, perhaps it was this all along, and not the compensator valve stuck after all!
Many hours later, and many litres of brake fluid down the line, i am a wiser man!
It is a 405, by the way, one of the last ones, an executive estate!
Many thanks for the suggestions
Jonathan

Sunday, 31 December 2006
Edited Sunday, 31 December 2006

Discussion Archived

zodiac
Joined Oct 2006
273 posts

Liike mark said the answer with this problem is always to remove the brake caliper and turn the caliper so the nipple aims up over and then bleed the rear brakes with the piston wedged with some wood. The compensator sometimes gives off a squeaking noise which can distract you from thinking the fault lies in the calipers, but the fault is usually always trapped air in the caliper. nice to see you sorted the problem in the end

Wednesday, 3 January 2007

Discussion Archived

Messages 1 to 5 of 5.


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